Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 19:46

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old Norse gaukr (cuckoo).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gowk (plural gowks)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) A cuckoo.
  2. A fool.
    • 1816, Sir Walter Scott, Old Mortality, ch. 8:
      "Ill-fard, crazy, crack-brained gowk, that she is!" exclaimed the housekeeper.
    • 1976, Robert Nye, Falstaff:
      God has sent me gowks for secretaries.

VerbEdit

gowk (third-person singular simple present gowks, present participle gowking, simple past and past participle gowked)

  1. To make foolish; to stupefy.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)