Last modified on 7 June 2014, at 02:39

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

An allusion to Admiral Edward Vernon (nicknamed "Old Grog" after the grogram coat he habitually wore), who in 1740 ordered his sailors' rum to be watered down.[1][2]
Also claimed is:
From Catalan, groc (yellow), the colour of the low-quality alcohol.[3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grog (uncountable)

  1. an alcoholic beverage made with rum and water, especially that once issued to sailors of the Royal Navy.
  2. Any alcoholic beverage.
  3. A type of pre-fired clay that has been ground and screened to a specific particle size.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dictionary.com
  2. ^ Etymonline
  3. ^ Krueger, Dennis (December 1982). "Why On Earth Do They Call It Throwing?" Studio Potter Vol. 11, Number 1.[1] (etymology - cites Illustrated Dictionary of Ceramics.)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

grog m (plural grogs)

  1. grog (drink made from rum)

External linksEdit