gumph

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

gumph (plural unattested)

  1. A foolish person; a gump
    • 1860, Susan Warner and Anna Bartlett Warner, Say and Seal, page 246
      Drossy saw ’em in her drawer, and for all the gumph he is, he knew the writing; and I made him get ’em for me this morning while they were at breakfast.
    • 1919, St. John Greer Ervine, John Ferguson
      He strikes me as the perfect example of an intellectual gumph. He knows too much!
    • 1938, George Smith, The Cornhill Magazine, page 816
      ‘ Tell them what, you gumph ? ’ cried Squibs. ‘ Are you all mad ? ’
    • 1971, Ronald Hayman, John Gielgud, Random House, New York
      If Romeo were just a lovesick gumph, occasionally falling into a deeper trance in which he speaks unaccountable poetry, then Olivier is your Romeo.
  2. (uncountable) Gumption; grit.
    • a. 1923, Violet Hunt, The Coach
      Never lifted a hand to defend himself, hadn’t got any gumph.
    • 1955, Mathematics Teaching, Association of Teachers of Mathematics
      ...anyone likely to use the book would surely have enough gumph to try both before giving up.
  3. (uncountable, slang) Gumpth; excess.
    • 1998 December 15, T.C. Van Adler, St. Agatha's Breast: A Novel, St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0312200196,
      Things had not been going will with Pino ever since he started to take Sister Apollonia’s bloated gumph as gospel. Thanks to the wacko, his man was actually getting a Christ complex.
    • 2000 April, Linda Grant, Remind Me Who I Am, Again, Granta Books, New Ed edition (July), ISBN 1862072442, page 266
      ‘It’s like listening to adolescent daughters with all their gumph and they’re going to chew you out...
    • 2003 June 6, Chris Wooding, Crashing, Scholastic Point, Scholastic Paperbacks (November), ISBN 0439090121, pages 100-101
      Between a couple of silent factories, beat-box music drifted over to us. Some kind of unrecognizable chart gumph; the usual mix of soul and rap.
Last modified on 20 June 2013, at 18:28