Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 20:07

habiliment

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English habilement, from Old French habillement "clothe".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

habiliment (plural habiliments)

  1. Clothes, especially clothing appropriate for someone's job, status, or to an occasion.
    • 1839: Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
      ... Mrs Crummles was then occupied in exchanging the habiliments of a melodramatic empress for the ordinary attire of matrons in the nineteenth century.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 52
      Bananas with their great ragged leaves, like the tattered habiliments of an empress in adversity, grew close up to the house.
  2. Equipment or furnishings characteristic of a place or being; trappings.

TranslationsEdit