hang on

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

hang on (third-person singular simple present hangs on, present participle hanging on, simple past and past participle hung on)

  1. (idiomatic) To wait a moment (usually imperative).
    Hang on. Let me check.
  2. To hold, grasp, or grip.
    Hang on to the handle so you don't drop it.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern. Then, for a jiffy, I hung on and fought for breath.
  3. (idiomatic) To keep; to store something for someone
    Hang on to my jacket until I get back.
  4. (idiomatic) To pay close attention.
    The audience hangs on his every word.
  5. (idiomatic) To continually believe in something; to have faith in.
    He's got a philosophy he hangs on to.
  6. (idiomatic) To persevere.
    Just hang on and keep going; this pain won't last forever.
    • 1972 : Perfect Day by Lou Reed
      It's such a perfect day, I'm glad I spend it with you
      Such a perfect day you just keep me hanging on
      You just keep me hanging on

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 4 April 2014, at 05:46