Last modified on 22 June 2014, at 11:50

hangar

See also: Hangar and hangár

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French hangar (shed, hangar), from Middle French hanghart (enclosure near a house), from Old French hangart, *hamgart, from Old Frankish *haimgard (fence around a group of houses), from *haim (home, village, hamlet) + *gard (yard). More at home, yard.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hangar (plural hangars)

  1. A large garage-like structure where aircraft are kept.
    The plane taxied on over to the hangar for repairs.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 9
      By the side of it ran an open hangar upheld by a score of rough tarred posts.

TranslationsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Not to be confused with “hanger” (a device for hanging).


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *haimgard (enclosure around a home).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hangar m (plural hangars)

  1. shed, barn, warehouse
  2. hangar

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

hangar m (invariable)

  1. hangar

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French hangar, of Germanic origins.

NounEdit

hangar m (plural hangars)

  1. shed

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hangar m

  1. hangar

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

hangar m (plural hangares)

  1. hangar (large structure where aircraft are kept)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

hangar m (plural hangares)

  1. hangar

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

hangar c

  1. hangar, a garage like building for aircraft.

DeclensionEdit