Last modified on 20 June 2013, at 20:42

hash slinger

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

hash slinger (plural hash slingers)

  1. (chiefly US, idiomatic) A cook or food server in a cheap restaurant, especially one who is discourteous or inattentive to customers.
    • 1904, "The Evolution and Passing of the Popular Fifteen Cent Lunch," Weekly News-Review (Indiana, USA), 8 April, p. 1 (retrieved 5 Dec 2010):
      At first the spread was not very elaborate. . . . Originally it consisted of a chunk of well greased sole leather served hot, two boiled potatoes, a cup of muddy coffee, a bold of bread, a grunt or growl from the hash slinger, and, in warm weather, a few flies.
    • 1929, "Says Customer Has Desire To Tip Waitresses," San Jose Evening News, 21 June, p. 6 (retrieved 5 Dec 2010):
      The ‘hash-slinger’ type of waitress of former years has disappeared from the great majority of restaurants.
    • 2008, Nick Canepa, "Tiger, Torrey triumph," San Diego Union-Tribune, 17 June, p. A1 (retrieved 5 Dec 2010):
      San Diego still has trouble making up its mind as to which it wants to be—a hash-slinger or a gourmet chef.

ReferencesEdit