Last modified on 30 September 2014, at 21:54

have in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

have in (third-person singular simple present has in, present participle having in, simple past and past participle had in)

  1. (transitive) To allow in; grant permission or admittance to; invite in or over; admit.
    • 1953, LIFE - Mar 30, 1953 - Page 90:
      We managed to pick up a score of these young people from the streets and have them in for lunch.
    • 1955, United States. Congress. House, Hearings:
      So then we tried to pinpoint it and improve it. It is the very selfsame thing, sir, we are doing now, but our superintendent is having us in now for meetings, and has in the last few days, to study results and to see where we are failing.
    • 2008, Janis Ian, Society's child:
      She agreed to have me in for one show, just to see how I was doing.
    • 2009, Samuel Butler, Works of Samuel Butler:
      At other times when not quite well he would have them in for the fun of shaking his will at them.
    • 2009, Patience Brooks, Her Destiny:
      What the hell does David have me in for? Dinner perhaps?
    • 2010, Herbert McCabe, The New Creation:
      When you invite a friend into your home you offer him a drink, if it is only a cup of tea, and more formally, when you spend an evening with friends you have them in for coffee or for a meal [...]