Last modified on 27 September 2014, at 12:40
See also: Heft

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hefð.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heft (countable and uncountable, plural hefts)

  1. (uncountable) Weight.
    • T. Hughes
      a man of his age and heft
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Of all the queer collections of humans outside of a crazy asylum, it seemed to me this sanitarium was the cup winner. […] When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose.
  2. Heaviness, the feel of weight.
    A high quality hammer should have good balance and heft.
  3. (Northern England) A piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted.
  4. An animal that has become hefted thus.
  5. (West of Ireland) Poor condition in sheep caused by mineral deficiency.
  6. The act or effort of heaving; violent strain or exertion.
  7. (US, dated, colloquial) The greater part or bulk of anything.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Pickering to this entry?)
    The heft of the crop was spoiled.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

heft (third-person singular simple present hefts, present participle hefting, simple past and past participle hefted)

  1. (transitive) To lift up; especially, to lift something heavy.
    He hefted the sack of concrete into the truck.
  2. (transitive) To test the weight of something by lifting it.
  3. (transitive, Northern England and Scotland) (of a farm animal, especially a flock of sheep) To become accustomed and attached to an area of mountain pasture.
  4. (obsolete) past participle of to heave.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heft n (plural heften, diminutive heftje n)

  1. handle of a knife or other tool, haft, hilt
  2. (metaphor, used absolutely: het heft) control, charge
    Zij heeft het heft in handen hier
    She's the one that runs the show here.

VerbEdit

heft

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of heffen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of heffen

KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Iranian, from Proto-Indo-Iranian, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥. Compare Avestan [script needed] (hapta), Persian هفت (haft), Ossetian авд (avd), Pashto اووه (uwə).

Cardinal numberEdit

heft

  1. (cardinal) seven

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hefð.

NounEdit

heft (plural hefts)

  1. A piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted.
  2. An animal that has become hefted thus.

VerbEdit

tae heft (third-person singular simple present hefts, present participle heftin, simple past heftit, past participle heftit)

  1. (transitive) The process by which a farm animal becomes accustomed to an area of mountain pasture.