Last modified on 29 July 2014, at 23:13
See also: Him, hĩm, and hím

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Old English him dative singular of he (masculine) or it (neuter); from Proto-Germanic *himmai (compare Dutch hem).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

him (personal pronoun, objective case)

  1. A masculine pronoun; he as a grammatical object.
    1. With dative effect or as an indirect object. [from 9th c.]
      • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula:
        ‘I promise,’ he said as I gave him the papers.
    2. Following a preposition. [from 9th c.]
      • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice:
        She was in no humour for conversation with anyone but himself; and to him she had hardly courage to speak.
    3. With accusative effect or as a direct object. [from 12th c.]
      • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House:
        ‘He's got it buttoned in his breast. I saw him put it there.’
  2. (now rare) Used reflexively: (to) himself. [from 9th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts XII:
      Apon a daye apoynted, the kynge arayed hym in royall apparell, and set hym in his seate, and made an oracion unto them.
    • 1765, Oliver Goldsmith, The traveller, or, A prospect of society
      Though poor the peasant’s hut, his feasts though small,
      He sees his little lot the lot of all;
      [...]
      But calm, and bred in ignorance and toil,
      Each wish contracting, fits him to the soil.
  3. With nominative effect: he, especially as a predicate after be, or following a preposition. [from 15th c.]
    • c. 1616, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, First Folio 1623, V.10:
      Before my body, I throw my warlike Shield: Lay on Macduffe, And damn'd be him, that first cries hold, enough.
    • 2003, Claire Cozens, The Guardian, 11 Jun 2003:
      Lowe quit the West Wing last year amid rumours that he was unhappy that his co-stars earned more than him.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit

See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

NounEdit

him m

  1. h-prothesized form of im

LuxembourgishEdit

PronounEdit

him

  1. third-person masculine singular, dative: him, to him
    Ech baken him e Kuch
    I'm baking him a cake
  2. third-person feminine singular, dative: her, to her
    Hie war mat him gëschter
    He was with her yesterday
  3. third-person neuter singular, dative: it, to it

DeclensionEdit


MizoEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

him

  1. safe
  2. unscathed

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

him

  1. dative singular of or hit: (to) him, it
  2. dative plural of , hit or hēo: (to) them

Old FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

him

  1. him

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian him

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

him

  1. him
  2. himself
  3. itself

Usage notesEdit

  • "Him" is used roughly like "himself" and "itself" in English. In these cases, it is used after a verb when there is another object in the sentence. For example, "Dy partij stelt him op it stânpunt fan it federalisme" more literally means "This party puts itself on the standpoint of federalism".