Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 17:38

hocus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

hocus (third-person singular simple present hocuses, present participle hocusing or hocussing, simple past and past participle hocused or hocussed)

  1. To play a trick on; hoax; cheat.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  2. To stupefy with drugged liquor.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 5, The Hocussing of Cigarette[1]:
      Then I had a good think on the subject of the hocussing of Cigarette, and I was reluctantly bound to admit that once again the man in the corner had found the only possible solution to the mystery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
  3. To adulterate; to drug (liquor).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Dickens to this entry?)

NounEdit

hocus (plural hocuses)

  1. One who cheats or deceives.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of South to this entry?)
  2. drugged liquor

See alsoEdit