Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 09:43

hoo

See also: hóo

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hoo, shoo "she" from Old English hēo "she". More at she.

PronounEdit

hoo (third-person singular, feminine, nominative case, accusative and possessive her, possessive hers, reflexive herself)

  1. (South Lancashire, Yorkshire and Derbyshire) she
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hoo, ho. More at ho.

InterjectionEdit

hoo!

  1. (obsolete) hurrah; an exclamation of triumphant joy
    Our enemy is banish'd! he is gone! Hoo! hoo! — Shakespeare, Coriolanus.
    With, hoo! such bugs and goblins in my life — Shakespeare, Hamlet.
  2. (Geordie) Used to grab the attention of others.
    "Hoo yee!"

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English howe, hu "how" from Old English "how". More at how.

AdverbEdit

hoo (not comparable)

  1. (Northumbrian, Geordie) how

ReferencesEdit

  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4[1]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [3]

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronuncistionEdit

NounEdit

hoo

  1. aitch (The name of the Latin-script letter H/h.)

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of h-kirjain ("letter H, letter h") instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

AdverbEdit

hoo (not comparable)

  1. how
  2. why