Last modified on 23 March 2015, at 21:51

houser

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

house +‎ -er

NounEdit

houser (plural housers)

  1. One who, or that which, houses.
    • 2003, Scott Leckie, National Perspectives on Housing Rights, page 150:
      Federal aid for foster care - in effect a houser of last resort for children from troubled families - may also be legitimately described as an entitlement.
    • 2007, Charles Clemons, Funky Shrooms and Other Exquisite Delights, page 21:
      They thought they had busted a moonshiner or a houser of illegal aliens, but what was really below their feet was beyond their wildest imaginations!
    • 2013, Philip McCallion, Housing for the Elderly: Policy and Practice Issues, page 230:
      Social work and gerontological literature for the most part have omitted Haniet Tubman's role as a houser of the aged.

CzechEdit

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

houser m

  1. gander (a male goose)
  2. lumbago