Last modified on 28 March 2014, at 15:33

hyle

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

One of several English variants (in casu Modern English, in the 17th and 18th century) for the Medieval Latin hyle, a transliteration of Aristotle’s concept of matter, in Ancient Greek ὕλη (húlē, wood(s), material(s), matter, subject) or πρώτη ὕλη (prṓtē húlē, fundamental, undifferentiated matter)

NounEdit

hyle (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, philosophy) matter
  2. The first matter of the cosmos, from which the four elements arose, according to the doctrines of Empedocles and Aristotle.

ReferencesEdit

  • OED: The Oxford English Dictionary, second edition, Oxford University Press, 1989

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hyle (imperative hyl, infinitive at hyle, present tense hyler, past tense hylede, past participle har hylet)

  1. yell
  2. howl
  3. wail
  4. yowl
  5. whine
  6. hoot

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Transliteration of Aristotle’s concept of matter, in Ancient Greek ὕλη (húlē) or πρώτη ὕλη (“fundamental, undifferentiated matter”).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hȳlē f (genitive hȳlēs); first declension

  1. matter, the fundamental matter of all things, as opposing the form of all things (Aristotle’s doctrine of matter and form or hylomorphism); in Mediaeval Latin respectively materia prima and forma substantialis
  2. the matter of the body, as opposing the soul or mind (Aristotle’s doctrine of the soul)
  3. the first matter of the cosmos, an inaccurate interpretation of Aristotle's ἡ πρώτη ὕλη or materia prima

InflectionEdit

First declension, Greek type.

Number Singular Plural
nominative hȳlē hȳlae
genitive hȳlēs hȳlārum
dative hȳlae hȳlīs
accusative hȳlēn hȳlās
ablative hȳlē hȳlīs
vocative hȳlē hȳlae

ReferencesEdit

  • L&S: Lewis & Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford University Press, 1969
  • See further references under ὕλη (húlē).