imped

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Coined on Latinate roots (im- +‎ -ped) by Richard Owen in 1861 as a calque of Aristotle’s Ancient Greek ἀπούς (apous).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

imped (plural impeds)

  1. A creature without feet.
    • 1861: Richard Owen in:
    • 1894: The Reverend Richard Owen (Richard Owen’s grandson), The Life of Richard Owen, volume 2, page 119
      Aristotle had divided the group into bipeds, quadrupeds and impeds.
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

imp +‎ -ed

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

imped (not comparable)

  1. (especially of feathers in falconry) Engrafted, eked, implanted; supplemented by imping.
ReferencesEdit
  • imped, ppl. a.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]
Last modified on 28 November 2013, at 15:47