Last modified on 6 August 2014, at 06:14

implex

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin implexus.

AdjectiveEdit

implex (not comparable)

  1. Intricate, involved, entangled, complicated, complex.
    • c. 1711, Joseph Addison, essay in The Spectator, 9 February 1711/12:
      The fable of every poem is, according to Aristotle’s division, either simple or implex. It is called simple when there is no change of fortune in it; implex, when the fortune of the chief actor changes from bad to good, or from good to bad. The implex fable is thought most perfect: I suppose, because it is more proper to stir up the passion of the reader, and to surprise him with a greater variety of accidents.

NounEdit

implex (plural implexes)

  1. A genealogical coefficient of a given genealogical tree; defined as the difference between the number of theoretical ancestors of a person and the number of his/her real ones in a given generation.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (adjective):
  • (noun):
    • Joao Dal Poz Neto & Marcio Ferriera da Silva, "MaqPar: A Homemade Tool for the Study of Kinship Networks" in Hvibrant, v.6, n.2, p.73, footnote 3; Retrieved 25 February 2010, from Google Docs website, original source file: [1]