Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 12:39

inexpugnable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ expugn +‎ -able.

AdjectiveEdit

inexpugnable (comparative more inexpugnable, superlative most inexpugnable)

  1. Impossible to eliminate or destroy; impregnable.
    • 1840, Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship[1]:
      My one hope of the world, my inexpugnable consolation in looking at the miseries of the world, is that this is altering.
    • 1911, H. G. Wells, The Country of the Blind, And Other Stories[2]:
      It crept into one's mind, a distress as vague and inexpugnable as a sea fog on a spring morning, and presently one shivered and wanted to go indoors...
    • 1915, Joseph Conrad, Victory[3]:
      This seemed to be an inexpugnable refuge, where we could live untroubled and learn to know each other."

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