Last modified on 18 August 2014, at 13:33

interpose

See also: interposé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French interposer, modification (influenced by poser to put, place), from Latin interpōnō, from inter (between) + pōnō (I place, put).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

interpose (third-person singular simple present interposes, present participle interposing, simple past and past participle interposed)

  1. (transitive) To insert something (or oneself) between other things.
    to interpose a screen between the eye and the light
    • Cowper
      Mountains interposed / Make enemies of nations.
    • Shakespeare
      What watchful cares do interpose themselves / Betwixt your eyes and night?
  2. (transitive) To interrupt a conversation by introducing a different subject or making a comment.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  3. (intransitive) To be inserted between parts or things; to come between.
    • Cowper
      long hid by interposing hill or wood.
  4. (intransitive) To intervene in a dispute, or in a conversation.

SynonymsEdit

  • (To insert something (or oneself) between other things): insert
  • (To interrupt a conversation by introducing a different subject or making a comment): interrupt

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

interpose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of interposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of interposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of interposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of interposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of interposer

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

interpose

  1. third-person singular past historic of interporre

AnagramsEdit