Last modified on 26 July 2014, at 11:31

intersperse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin interspersus.

VerbEdit

intersperse (third-person singular simple present intersperses, present participle interspersing, simple past and past participle interspersed)

  1. To mix two things irregularly, placing things of one kind among things of other:
    • 1991, Frank Biocca, Television and Political Advertising: Signs, codes, and images, page 76:
      For example, a commercial sequence might intersperse pictures of a senator working in his office with shots of ordinary Americans happily working in various walks of life.
    1. (transitive) To scatter or insert (something) into or among (other things).
      Mother Nature interspersed a few dandelions among the petunias, but it was a pretty garden, anyway.
      • 1985, Jane Y. Murdock, Barbara V. Hartmann, Communication and language intervention program (CLIP) for individuals with moderate to severe handicaps, page 46:
        Review tasks are particularly useful to intersperse when students are experiencing considerable failure.
    2. (transitive) To place or insert — to diversify by placing or inserting — other things among (something).
      Mother Nature interspersed the petunias with a few dandelions, but it was a pretty garden, anyway.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit