Last modified on 19 May 2013, at 19:05

isodiabatic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ancient Greek

AdjectiveEdit

isodiabatic (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to the reception or the giving out of equal quantities of heat by a substance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Rankine to this entry?)
    Isodiabatic lines are a pair of of lines or curves exhibiting, on a diagram of energy, the law of variation of the pressure and density of a fluid, the one during the lowering, and the other during the raising, of its temperature, when the quantity of heat given out by the fluid during any given stage of the one process is equal to the quantity received during the corresponding stage of the other. Such lines are said to be isodiabatic with respect to each other.

Related termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.