Last modified on 18 November 2014, at 21:31

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

  • (dialectal) hit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English it, hit ( > English dialectal hit (it)), from Old English hit (it), from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with West Frisian it (it), Low German it (it), Dutch het (it), German es (it). More at he.

Alternative formsEdit

  • itt (obsolete)

PronounEdit

it (subjective and objective it, reflexive and intensive itself, possessive adjective and noun its)

  1. The third-person singular personal pronoun used to refer to an inanimate object, to an inanimate thing with no or unknown sex or gender.
    Put it over there.
    Take each day as it comes.
  2. The third-person singular personal pronoun used to refer to an animate entity of unknown gender.
    She took the baby and held it in her arms.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter IV:
      A child cannot quarrel with its elders, as I had done; cannot give its furious feelings uncontrolled play, as I had given mine, without experiencing afterwards the pang of remorse and the chill of reaction.
  3. Used to refer to oneself when identifying oneself, often on the phone, but not limited to this situation.
    It's me. John.
  4. The impersonal pronoun, used without referent as the subject of an impersonal verb or statement. (known as the dummy pronoun or weather it)
    It is nearly 10 o’clock.
    It’s very cold today.
    It’s lonely without you.
  5. The impersonal pronoun, used as a placeholder for a delayed subject, or less commonly, object. (known as the dummy pronoun or, more formally in linguistics, a syntactic expletive)
    It is easy to see how she would think that.
    I find it odd that you would say that.
    He saw to it that everyone would vote for him.
  6. (obsolete, relative) That which; what.
    • 1643, Thomas Browne, Religio Medici, II.2:
      In briefe, I am content, and what should providence add more? Surely this is it wee call Happinesse, and this doe I enjoy [...].
See Wiktionary:English inflection for other personal pronouns.
QuotationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

it (plural its)

  1. One who is neither a he nor a she; a creature; a dehumanized being.
    • 1995, Neil Weiner, Sharon E. Robinson Kurpius, Shattered innocence (page 8)
      Too often, children become an "it" in their homes and their humanness is devalued.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      His master glanced up quickly, and removed the letter from his hands. "I'm surprised at you, James," he remarked severely. "A secretary should control itself. Don't forget that the perfect secretary is an it: an automatic machine—a thing incapable of feeling.…"
  2. The person who chases and tries to catch the other players in the playground game of tag.
    In the next game, Adam and Tom will be it
    • 2000, Katherine T. Thomas, Amelia M. Lee, Jerry R. Thomas, Physical education for children (page 464)
      When there are only two children left who haven't been tagged, I will stop the game, and we will start over with those children starting as the Its.
  3. (UK, uncountable) The game of tag.
    Let's play it at breaktime.

AdjectiveEdit

it (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) most fashionable.
    • Vibe, Vol. 15, No. 9, p. 202, September 2007:
      Going away for the weekend and feel the need to profile en route? This is the "it" bag.
    • David Germain, Hilarious ‘Kick-Ass’ delivers bloody fun, Associated Press, 2010:
      With Hit Girl, Moretz is this year's It Girl, alternately sweet, savage and scary.

Etymology 2Edit

AbbreviationEdit

it

  1. (language) Italian.
  2. Italy.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzeriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *it, *ït.

NounEdit

it (Cyrillic spelling ит)

  1. dog

VerbEdit

it (Cyrillic spelling ит)

  1. get lost (imperative)

Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *it, *ït.

NounEdit

it

  1. dog

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GreenlandicEdit

AffixEdit

it

  1. indicates a state of being without something.
    maani nipaappoq - It is quiet here.
    sikuippoq - There is no ice.

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

it

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of

Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

it

  1. Alternative form of het

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (2nd sg.): at

VerbEdit

it

  1. second-person singular present indicative of is
  2. third-person plural present indicative of is

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *it.

PronounEdit

it n

  1. it

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German: et

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ıt (“dog”), from Proto-Turkic *īt, *ıyt, *ɨt, *it.

NounEdit

it (definite accusative iti, plural itler)

  1. dog
  2. a word for aspersion

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

It's generally used in countryside when meant "dog". But if the dog isn't loved, it can be said "it" for it, too.

VerbEdit

it

  1. Second-person imperative of itmek. (to push)

TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ıt (“dog”), from Proto-Turkic *īt, *ıyt, *ɨt, *it.

NounEdit

it (definite accusative idi, plural itler)

  1. dog

DeclensionEdit


UzbekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *ɨt, *it

NounEdit

it (plural itlar)

  1. dog

VolapükEdit

DeterminerEdit

it

  1. (with a personal pronoun) self; myself; yourself; himself; herself; itself; ourselves; themselves; emphasises the identity or singularity of the modified noun phrase

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

it

  1. (literary) second-person singular of i

West FrisianEdit

ArticleEdit

it n

  1. the (the definite article that is placed before neuter nouns. Non-neuter (common gender) nouns take the article de).

PronounEdit

it (personal pronoun)

  1. it: the third-person singular, referring to something neutral, genderless.