kurrajong

EnglishEdit

the flower of a 'little kurrajong'

EtymologyEdit

From Dharug garrajung (fishing line), from the use made of the bark.

NounEdit

kurrajong (plural kurrajongs)

  1. (Australia) Any of a number of species of tree or shrub in the genus Brachychiton.
    • 1906, Henry Charles Lennox Anderson, Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales, Volume 16,
      My young friend, Master Keith McKeown, now finds this beetle under the stones about the roots of the kurrajong at Wagga, and also sheltering during the winter in the seed-pods on the trees.
    • 2008, Philip A. Clarke, Aboriginal Plant Collectors: Botanists and Australian Aboriginal People in the Nineteenth Century, page 50,
      The black kurrajong has a fibrous bark that Aboriginal artefact-makers used as a raw material to make string for their lines and carry-bags.
    • 2011, Ian Fraser, Peter Marsack, A Bush Capital Year: A Natural History of the Canberra Region, page 90,
      The groves of Kurrajongs along the saddle of Mount Majura were founded last century.
  2. (Australia) A peanut tree, Sterculia quadrifida, native to eastern coastal Australia; a red- or orange-fruited kurrajong.

External linksEdit

Last modified on 25 December 2013, at 04:24