Last modified on 25 August 2014, at 03:28

lachrymose

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacrimōsus, from lacrima (tear), + -osus (-ful), from Old Latin dacruma, from Proto-Indo-European *dakru-, cognate with English tear.

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

lachrymose (comparative more lachrymose, superlative most lachrymose)

  1. Tearful, sorrowful, sad, pertaining to tears, weeping, causing tears or crying.
    • 1927, Thornton Wilder, The Bridge of San Luis Rey, page 69:
      It is true that Limeans were given to interpolating trivial songs into the most exquisite comedies and some lachrymose effects into the austerest music; but at least they never submitted to the boredom of a misplaced veneration.

TranslationsEdit

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