Last modified on 15 July 2014, at 23:49

laught

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

laught

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of laugh
    • 1638, John Wilkins, The Discovery of a World in the Moone[1]:
      Other truths have beene formerly accounted as ridiculous as this, I shall specifie that of the Antipodes, which have beene denied and laught at by many wise men and great Schollers, such as were Herodotus, St. Austin, Lactantius, the Venerable Bede, Lucretius the Poet, Procopius, and the voluminous Abulensis with others.
    • 1665-1676, Sir John Lauder, Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36[2]:
      They made this poor fellow beleive that he was only condemned to the galleys, at which he laught, telling that it appeared they knew not he was a smith, so that he could easily file his chaines and run away.
    • 1679, Beaumont and Fletcher, The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes[3]:
      How Epidemick errors by thy Play Were laught out of esteeme, so purged away.
    • 1899, William Ralph Inge, Christian Mysticism[4]:
      "For this sight I laught mightily, and that made them to laugh that were about me.