Last modified on 9 October 2013, at 08:01

leg-breaker

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leg-breaker (plural leg-breakers)

  1. (chiefly US, slang) A violent thug, especially one employed as an enforcer by a criminal organization.
    • 1974, Victor Riesel, "Mob money took Rebozo," Rome News-Tribune (US), 4 Sep., p. 4 (retrieved 5 Jan. 2009):
      The thug was an acknowledged leg breaker, a shakedown artist, a peddler of violence.
  2. A person whose job is to break the legs of poultry in a food processing facility.
    • 2000, M. McDiarmid et al., "Male and Female Rate Differences in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Injuries," Environmental Research, vol. 83, no. 1, p. 28:
      For example, jobs described as meat wrapper or leg breaker would both be coded "butcher meat cutter."
  3. (soccer) A tackle or other on-field maneuver capable of breaking a player's leg.
    • 2008, "Mailbox," football365.com, 22 Dec. (retrieved 5 Jan. 2009):
      Arca performed a similar stunt with a high over-the-top-of-the-ball tackle on Andy Johnson, except he connected. It is what is called a leg-breaker.
  4. (cycling) A demanding bicycling competition or the course on which such a competition is held.
    • 2003, Tim Maloney, "First Edition News for May 22, 2003," cyclingnews.com, 22 May (retrieved 5 Jan. 2009):
      Zoncolan is a fabled leg breaker of a 13.3km climb that is one of the toughest ascents ever included in a major stage race.
  5. (cricket) A cricketer who bowls leg breaks.
    • 1905, The Strand Magazine, p. 703:
      Armstrong is a leg-breaker, with eight fielders on the on-side. Probably he would do better if he bowled more at the wicket.
  6. (cricket) A leg break ball.
    • 1894, "Canadian Cricketers Lead," New York Times, 18 Sep., p. 3 (retrieved 5 Jan. 2009):
      Noble joined Wood, and the pair changed the aspect of affairs, 45 being up before a leg breaker from McGiverin proved too good for Noble's defense.

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