Last modified on 5 June 2014, at 12:24
See also: leið

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

leid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leiden
  2. imperative of leiden

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German leid.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leid (comparative leider, superlative am leidesten)

  1. uncomfortable

Usage notesEdit

Only used in certain phrases.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • leid in Duden online

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

leid f (genitive leide, nominative plural leideanna)

  1. hint, inkling
  2. prompt
  3. pointer, clue

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *laiþaz, whence also Old English lāþ, Old Norse leiðr.

AdjectiveEdit

leid

  1. uncomfortable

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leid (plural leids)

  1. language
Usage notesEdit
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leid.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lede, leed, from Old English lēad (the metal, lead). More at lead.

NounEdit

leid (plural leids)

  1. lead