liable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lier (to bind), from Latin ligare (to bind, to tie)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪ̯əbəl/, [ˈlaɪ̯əbɫ̩], [ˈlaɪ̯əbəɫ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪəbəl

AdjectiveEdit

liable (comparative more liable, superlative most liable)

  1. Bound or obliged in law or equity; responsible; answerable.
    The surety is liable for the debt of his principal.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 34.
      The passion for philosophy, like that for religion, seems liable to this inconvenience
  2. Exposed to a certain contingency or casualty, more or less probable.
  3. (as predicate, with "to" and an infinitive) Likely.
    Someone is liable to slip on your icy sidewalk.

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Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 19:05