See also: -lich and lịch

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old English līċ, from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-. Cognate with Dutch lijk, German Leiche, Norwegian lik, Swedish lik, Danish lig. Compare like, -like, -ly.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lich (plural liches)

  1. (archaic) A corpse or dead body. [from 9th c.]
    • 1983, Poul Anderson, Time Patrolman, Sci-Fi, ISBN 9780812530766:
      She saw him again that eventide, but then he was a reddened lich.
  2. (fantasy, roleplay) A reanimated corpse or undead being.
    • 1974, Karl Edward Wagner, ‘Sticks’:
      It was a lich’s face – desiccated flesh tight over its skull.
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lich (plural lichs)

  1. A body.
    • 1362, William Langland, Piers Plowman, XI.2:
      A wyf […] Þat lene was of lich and of louh chere.
Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 03:45