Last modified on 16 November 2014, at 14:25

lie in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

lie in

  1. (archaic) To be brought to bed in childbirth.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 467:
      he had been driven to it by the distress he mentioned, the greatest indeed imaginable, that of five hungry children, and a wife lying in of the sixth, in the utmost want and misery.
  2. To stay in bed (longer than usual).
    I've got a day off tomorrow, so I might lie in till about 11.

Derived termsEdit