like a chicken with its head cut off

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

like a chicken with its head cut off

  1. (idiomatic) In a frantic, disorganized manner.
    • circa 1900, Jack London, "To Build a Fire":
      His idea of it was that he had been making a fool of himself, running around like a chicken with its head cut off—such was the simile that occurred to him.
    • 1911, Zane Grey, The Young Pitcher, ch. 9:
      Ken played or essayed to play right field for a while, but he ran around like a chicken with its head off.
    • 1920, Harold MacGrath, The Drums Of Jeopardy, ch. 27:
      I've been running round like a chicken with its head cut off.
    • 1962, "Nation: New Fail-Safe," Time, 28 Dec.:
      Says one Pentagon arms-control expert: "Our setup was actually designed to act in time of general war like a chicken with its head cut off. The brain could be destroyed and the nervous system severed. Then the military muscles would just jerk in uncontrolled spasms."
    • 2003, Linda Lael Miller, Shotgun Bride, ISBN 9780743422741, p. 121:
      Rushing around like a chicken with its head cut off would serve no purpose.

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Last modified on 9 October 2013, at 17:32