Last modified on 28 March 2014, at 22:44

like like

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

like like (third-person singular simple present like likes, present participle like liking, simple past and past participle like liked)

  1. (slang) To fancy.
    Do you just "like" her or do you "like like" her?
    • 2008, Meg Cabot, How to Be Popular, page 131:
      i seriously think he likes me. Like, LIKE likes me. Did you see how he let me draw all over his shoes today during the convocation? Oh my God. What a mess. Because of course there was NO WAY Jason LIKE liked Becca.
    • 2009, Laura Fitzgerald, One True Theory of Love:
      “I mean, he like likes her. Like, he likes her.” [] / “That's different than like-liking her. Are you saying you have other feelings for her?” Henry sighed.
    • 2010, Pseudonymous Bosch, This Isn't What It Looks Like:
      “Yeah, you know, like liked,” said Cass, automatically raising her eyebrows to make the point, even though the Jester couldn't see them. / [] / “Like liked? What does that mean—that I like her twice? But I don't like her even once—I loathe her thrice!” protested the Jester.

Usage notesEdit

  • Used by children and teenagers to distinguish between liking someone as a friend and fancying them; it's far less blunt than simply saying "fancy".
  • Generally used as part of a question (or in the answer to the question), and usually in comparison to "like".