Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 15:27

lining

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lining (plural linings)

  1. A covering for the inside surface of something.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 7
      The lobule margins, furthermore, are arched away from the lobe, with the consequence that (when fully inflated) the abaxial leaf surface forms the interior lining of the lobule.
    • 2013 July-August, Stephen P. Lownie, David M. Pelz, “Stents to Prevent Stroke”, American Scientist: 
      As we age, the major arteries of our bodies frequently become thickened with plaque, a fatty material with an oatmeal-like consistency that builds up along the inner lining of blood vessels.
  2. The material used for such a covering.
  3. The act of attaching such a covering.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lining

  1. Present participle of line.

AnagramsEdit