Last modified on 12 November 2014, at 22:02
See also: LO, -lo, , , , , łó, and lộ

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lo, loo, from Old English . Conflated in Middle English by lo!, a corruption of lok!, loke! (look!) (as in lo we! (look we!)). Cognate with Scots lo, lu (lo). See also look.

InterjectionEdit

lo

  1. (archaic) look, see, behold (in an imperative sense).

ContractionEdit

lo

  1. (colloquial) hello ('lo; see hallo)
TranslationsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of low.

AdjectiveEdit

lo (not comparable)

  1. Informal spelling of low.
    Can you turn the fan down to lo?
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

ArticleEdit

lo n sg (masculine el, feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

PronounEdit

lo

  1. it (third-person singular neuter direct pronoun)

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

lo

  1. sleep

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -u

PronounEdit

lo (enclitic, contracted 'l, proclitic el, contracted proclitic l')

  1. him (direct object)

DeclensionEdit


ChickasawEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. I

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo f (plural loyow)

  1. spoon

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

lo (plural lo-oj, accusative singular lo-on, accusative plural lo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter L/l.

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

lo m sg (feminine singular la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. Mutated form of o. (the)
Usage notesEdit

The l- forms of article are compulsorily used after the preposition por and adverb u. It is optional when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, after unstressed pronouns nos, vos and lles (when they are enclitc) of ambos, entrambos, todos, tras and copulative conjunction (e mais and tonic pronouns vós and nós followed by a numerical precision.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

lo m (accusative)

  1. Mutated form of o. (him)
Usage notesEdit

The l- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, and is suffixed to the preceding word

Related termsEdit

IdoEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. it (referring to a previous sentence or phrase, i.e. a fact rather than an object)

InterlinguaEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. it, that (direct object)
    Tu lo audi? – Do you hear it?

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illum, by dropping il- and -m. Latin illum is the accusative singular of ille.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -o

ArticleEdit

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo
i
gli
feminine  la le

lo m sg (plural gli)

  1. (the form of il that is used before the so-called impure consonants, that is, s+consonant, gn, pn, ps, x or z; before a vowel it becomes l’) the
    l’osso ― the bone
    lo stato ― the state
    lo zoo ― the zoo

PronounEdit

lo m sg (plural li)

  1. him
    Lo conosci? ― Do you know him?
  2. this or that thing, it
    quando te lo diedi ― when I gave it to you

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2002, Giuseppe Patota, Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, page p. 123:

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

lo (article)

  1. an article which converts a selbri into a sumti by "returning" an instance of the x1 sumti of the following word, which would otherwise function as a selbri; unlike "le", this word does not add a connotation of definiteness (i.e., it would not translate to English as "the")
    ro lo mlatu cu nelci lo ladru
    All cats like milk.

Usage notesEdit

  • A sumti phrase begun with lo ends with the elidable terminator ku unless no ambiguity results (in which case the terminator is elided).
  • The article lo behaves in a rather epsilon operator-like fashion. For example, let K be a predicate standing for the Lojban selbri klama, and let P be a predicate standing for the selbri prenu, then the Lojban sentence "lo prenu cu klama" [1] could be expressed symbolically as K(\epsilon x \, P(x)), where \epsilon x \, P(x) stands for "lo prenu".
  • In a phrase such as "lo ci prenu" (where ci acts as an "inner quantifier"), the selbri which follows it may or may not "distribute" with respect to it, so that the "three people" may or may not be interpreted as acting as a concerted group, or so-called "mass". To be more precise, if the group acts concertedly, precede lo with lu'o, or equivalently, replace lo with loi. If the group does not act concertedly, but is instead "innocent" (the selbri "distributes" with respect to it), then use lo'i instead of loi.[2]
    • A rule of thumb might be to avoid using inner quantifiers with lo altogether, just as in English it would wrong to say "*a three dogs".[3] On the other hand, "a set of three dogs" would translate as "lo'i ci gerku", and "a group of three dogs (act as a team to) surround a man" would be "loi ci gerku cu sruri lo nanmu".
  • In a phrase such as "ci lo prenu" (where ci acts as an "outer quantifier"), the selbri which follows it does "distribute" with respect to it, so that the selbri applies to each one of the three individuals, separately.[2]

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lojban for Beginners, Chapter 4, §2
  2. 2.0 2.1 How to use xorlo
  3. ^ LRG §6.7, Example 7.6

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

lo (Zhuyin ㄌㄛ˙)

  1. Pinyin reading of

Usage notesEdit

  • Almost all syllables transliterated from Chinese speech contain one of four diacritics indicating tone. This is one of the few syllables in the Chinese language that is transcribed only in a toneless form.
  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

lo n (definite singular loet; uncountable)

  1. lint

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

lo

  1. past tense of le

NovialEdit

PronounEdit

lo (genitive lon, plural los)

  1. he; him

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • lou (Mistralian)

ArticleEdit

lo (feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

Old ProvençalEdit

ArticleEdit

lo (feminine la)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

DescendantsEdit

  • Occitan: lo

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. Alternative form of o (third-person masculine singular objective pronoun.) Used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m). The consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary.
    Contá-lo (contar)
    To tell him.
    Contamo-lo (contamos)
    We told him.
    Fi-lo (fiz)
    I did it.

Coordinate termsEdit

  • no (following a nasal vowel), o (following an oral vowel)

See alsoEdit

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Objective
(direct object)
Objective
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Indefinite se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) lad

AdjectiveEdit

lo m (feminine loa, masculine plural los, feminine plural loas)

  1. (Sutsilvan) wide, broad

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) lartg
  • (Puter, Vallader) larg

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illum, accusative of ille. Pronoun form from Latin illud, neuter of ille.

ArticleEdit

lo

  1. neuter definite article used to make abstract nouns from adjectives; the
    lo pobre
    the poor

PronounEdit

lo

  1. impersonal neuter pronoun; it, that
    lo es
    it is

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo c

  1. a lynx

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lo

  1. to bother, to worry, to attend to


XhosaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lo

  1. this, this one

Related termsEdit


ZuluEdit

PronounEdit

-lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

See alsoEdit

DeterminerEdit

lo

  1. this (class 1, class 3)

See alsoEdit