Last modified on 2 October 2014, at 20:18

louche

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French louche.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

louche (comparative more louche, superlative most louche)

  1. Of questionable taste or morality; decadent.
    • 2012, "Upstairs Downstairs hosts the Kennedys and Wallis Simpson (these days, in British culture, the archetypal louche American)." (The other half lives, The Economist, February 25th)
  2. Not reputable or decent.
    • 1888, "The aunt will refuse; she will think the whole proceeding very louche!" (The Aspern Papers, Henry James)

VerbEdit

louche (third-person singular simple present louches, present participle louching, simple past and past participle louched)

  1. (intransitive, alcoholic beverages) To become cloudy when mixed with water, due to the presence of anethole. This is known as the ouzo effect.
    Certain anise-flavored drinks have developed a mystique based on the exotic appearance of louching.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old French lousche, from Latin lusca, feminine of luscus (one-eyed) ( > Old French lois).

AdjectiveEdit

louche m (feminine louche, masculine plural louches, feminine plural louches)

  1. shady, dubious, seedy
  2. (of a liquid) cloudy

NounEdit

louche f (plural louches)

  1. (in a liquid) cloudiness due to a suspension of fine particles

Etymology 2Edit

A dialectal (Norman-Picard) form of Old French louce, loce, from Old Frankish *lōtija, from Proto-Germanic *hlōþþijō. Cognate with Dutch loet (a tool to scrape or shovel). More at loot.

NounEdit

louche f (plural louches)

  1. ladle

Etymology 3Edit

Regular conjugation of -er verb loucher

VerbEdit

louche

  1. first-person singular present indicative of loucher
  2. third-person singular present indicative of loucher
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of loucher
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of loucher
  5. second-person singular imperative of loucher

External linksEdit