Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 19:42

lucifer

See also: Lucifer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a brand name for matches made by Samuel Jones from 1830, soon used generically for self-igniting matches of any brand. From lucifer (bringer of light)

NounEdit

lucifer (plural lucifers)

  1. (UK, archaic) A self-igniting match, ie. one which could be lit by striking on any surface (as opposed to safety matches which only light against the material on the side of the box).
    • 1915, George Asaf, song Pack up your Troubles
      While you've a lucifer to light your fag,
      Smile, boys, that's the style.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lucifer m (plural lucifers, diminutive lucifertje n)

  1. match

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From lūx (light) + ferō (bear, carry).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lūcifer m (feminine lūcifera, neuter lūciferum); first/second declension

  1. light-bringing

InflectionEdit

First/second declension, masculine nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative lūcifer lūcifera lūciferum lūciferī lūciferae lūcifera
genitive lūciferī lūciferae lūciferī lūciferōrum lūciferārum lūciferōrum
dative lūciferō lūciferae lūciferō lūciferīs lūciferīs lūciferīs
accusative lūciferum lūciferam lūciferum lūciferōs lūciferās lūcifera
ablative lūciferō lūciferā lūciferō lūciferīs lūciferīs lūciferīs
vocative lūcifer lūcifera lūciferum lūciferī lūciferae lūcifera

NounEdit

lucifer

  1. bringer of light
  2. morning star, daystar, planet Venus

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit