Last modified on 11 September 2014, at 13:22
See also: Lux, LUX, and Lux.

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin lūx (light); from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (white; light; bright). Cognates include Ancient Greek λευκός (leukós), Sanskrit रोचते (rocate), Middle Persian 𐭩𐭥𐭬 (rōz, day) and Old English noun lēoht (English light).

NounEdit

lux (plural lux)

  1. In the International System of Units, the derived unit of illuminance or illumination; one lumen per square metre. Symbol: lx
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare French luxer. See luxate.

VerbEdit

lux (third-person singular simple present luxes, present participle luxing, simple past and past participle luxed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To put out of joint; to luxate.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (white; light; bright). Cognates include Ancient Greek λευκός (leukós), Sanskrit रोचते (rocate) and Old English noun lēoht (English light).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lūx f (genitive lūcis); third declension

  1. light

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative lūx lūcēs
genitive lūcis lūcum
dative lūcī lūcibus
accusative lūcem lūcēs
ablative lūce lūcibus
vocative lūx lūcēs

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

lux m (plural lux or luxes)

  1. lux (the derived unit of illuminance)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

lux m (plural lux)

  1. lux

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

lux c

  1. lux (singular and plural)