Last modified on 30 January 2015, at 09:36

lyart

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French liart or Latin liardus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lyart

  1. (obsolete outside dialects, of a horse) Having dappled white and grey spots.
    • late 1300s, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Friar's Tale:
      Þat was wel twiȝt, myn owene lyard boy. / I pray God save þee, and Seinte Loy!

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ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French liart or Latin liardus.

AdjectiveEdit

lyart

  1. (of a horse) Having dappled white and grey spots.
    • 1853, Walter Watson, Poems and Songs: Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect:
      Yet, mony a reverend lyart pow, / Wha ne'er thocht muckle o' its jow, []
    • 1867, George W. Donald, Poems, Ballads, and Songs
      An' when his pow is lyart an' gray He'll bless the Brothock Burn.
    • 1896, Andrew Lang, A Monk of Fife
      [] in the lap of a damsel that rode at her rein, on a lyart palfrey []

AnagramsEdit