Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 16:06

lyceum

See also: Lyceum

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Λύκειον (Lúkeion) (the name of a gymnasium, or athletic training facility, near Athens where Aristotle established his school), from Λύκειος ("Lycian" or "wolf-killer").

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lyceum (plural lyceums)

  1. A public hall designed for lectures or concerts.
  2. (US) A school at a stage between elementary school and college.

TranslationsEdit

QuotationsEdit

public hall
  • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Life Without Principle
    At a lyceum, not long since, I felt that the lecturer had chosen a theme too foreign to himself, and so failed to interest me as much as he might have done.
  • 1875, Henry James, Roderick Hudson, New York Edition 1909, hardcover, page 414
    In the autumn he was to return home; his family - composed, as Rowland knew, of a father, who was a cashier in a bank, and five unmarried sisters, one of whom gave lyceum lectures on woman's rights, the whole resident at Buffalo, N.Y. - had been writing him peremptory letters and appealing to him as son, brother and fellow-citizen.