Last modified on 5 October 2014, at 14:01

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English male, from Anglo-Norman male, Old French male (bag, wallet), from Frankish *malha (bag), from Proto-Germanic *malhō (bag, pouch), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (leather pouch). Compare Dutch maal.

NounEdit

mail (countable and uncountable, plural mails)

  1. (now regional) A bag or wallet. [from 13th c.]
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      What, loo, man, see here of dyce a bale; / A brydelynge caste for that is in thy male!
  2. A bag containing letters to be delivered by post.
  3. The material conveyed by the postal service. [from 17th c.]
    Don't forget to pick up the mail on your way.
  4. (dated) A stagecoach, train or ship that delivers such post.
  5. The postal service or system in general. [from 17th c.]
    He decided to send his declaration by mail.
  6. (chiefly US, uncountable) The letters, parcels etc delivered to a particular address or person. [from 19th c.]
  7. (uncountable) Electronic mail, e-mail: a computer network–based service for sending, storing, and forwarding electronic messages. [from 20th c.]
  8. A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Usage notesEdit

In the United States, mails (plural) can mean "the postal system".

SynonymsEdit
  • (postal system): post (UK, Ireland, other dialects?)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

mail (third-person singular simple present mails, present participle mailing, simple past and past participle mailed)

  1. (transitive) To send (a letter, parcel, etc.) through the mail.
  2. (transitive) To send by electronic mail.
    Please mail me the spreadsheet by the end of the day.
    • 1983, "Donn Seeley", Source for 'Grab' (on newsgroup net.unix-wizards)
      There has been a crackdown on non-ARPA use of a local ARPA gateway, so I am reluctant to attempt to mail the file to ARPA sites.
    • 1998, "Michael Tomsett", Re: Multiple postings? (on newsgroup alt.music.manics)
      Since .mp3's are so big (well for me with a 33.6kp/s connection they are anyway) maybe you should offer on your site to mail the file to people who want it, and have them request it, thus saving your web space, your upload time and their download time []
    • 2003, "Chrissy", Re: Send mail with attachment (on newsgroup microsoft.public.excel.programming)
      If you mail an attachment from one mail client then it does not matter if the receiver uses a different mail client. The mail you send should be able to be read from their mail client.
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (transitive) To contact (a person) by electronic mail.
    I need to mail my tutor about the deadline.
    • 2000, "Carlton Alton Deltree", Whoever did this sucks... (on newsgroup alt.comp.virus)
      I was horrified but my data was OK. Then, it saw it open my e-mail package and start to mail my friends. I turned the power off.
    • 2002, Jessica Mann, The voice from the grave, page 189:
      'Yes, at Quantico. She was so excited by it, she sent all those emails, you remember I told you about it -' 'Yes, she mailed me from there too.'
    • 2011, Rose Budworth-Levine, Intimate Encounters, page 41:
      He mailed me and said he had managed to hack into my email accounts.
SynonymsEdit
  • (send through the mail): post
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English maille (mail armor), from Old French maille (loop, stich), from Latin macula (blemish, mesh), probably from Proto-Indo-European *smh₁-tleh₂, from *smeh₁- (smear, rub).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

Mail

mail (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) Armour consisting of metal rings or plates linked together.
  2. (nautical) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage.
  3. Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Gay:
      We [] strip the lobster of his scarlet mail.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mail (third-person singular simple present mails, present participle mailing, simple past and past participle mailed)

  1. (transitive) To arm with mail.
  2. (transitive) To pinion.

Etymology 3Edit

Middle English mal, male from Old English māl (speech, contract, agreement) from Old Norse mál (agreement, speech, lawsuit). Akin to Old English mæl (mǣl).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mail (plural mails)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) A monetary payment or tribute.
  2. (chiefly Scotland) Rent.
  3. (chiefly Scotland) Tax.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

mail (plural mails)

  1. A spot.

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin milium.

NounEdit

mail m

  1. millet
  2. birdseed

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mail

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mailen
  2. imperative of mailen

Fiji HindiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English mile (imperial measure of distance).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mail

  1. mile

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin malleus (hammer).

NounEdit

mail m (plural mails)

  1. mallet
  2. (sports, historical) pall mall
  3. mall, promenade
  4. (Quebec) mall, shopping mall

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from English email

NounEdit

mail m (plural mails)

  1. email
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

mail

  1. Imperative singular of mailen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of mailen.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English mail.

NounEdit

mail f (invariable)

  1. email

AnagramsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan, Surmiran) meil
  • (Sutsilvan) mel

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin melum, from Latin mālum. Compare Friulian mêl, Romanian măr.

NounEdit

mail m (plural mails)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) apple

SynonymsEdit