Last modified on 5 August 2014, at 21:04
See also: Mast and måst

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mast, from Old English mæst (mast), from Proto-Germanic *mastaz (mast, sail-pole), from Proto-Indo-European *mazdos (pole, mast). Cognate with Dutch mast, German Mast, and via Indo-European with Latin mālus, Russian мост (móst, bridge), Irish adhmad.

NounEdit

mast (plural masts)

  1. A tall, slim post or tower, usually tapering upward, used to support, for example, the sails on a ship, flags, floodlights, or communications equipment such as an aerial, usually supported by guy-wires.
  2. In naval tradition, a mast is a non-judicial punishment ("NJP") disciplinary hearing under which a commanding officer studies and disposes of cases involving those in his command.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mast (third-person singular simple present masts, present participle masting, simple past and past participle masted)

  1. To supply and fit a mast to a ship
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old English mæst (fallen nuts, food for swine), mæsten (to fatten, feed), from West Germanic; probably related to meat.

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NounEdit

mast (plural masts)

  1. The fruit of forest-trees (beech, oak, chestnut, pecan, etc.), especially if having fallen from the tree, used as fodder for pigs and other animals.
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, page 162:
      He [] would begin to pick up the seed-cases or mast, squeeze each one with his fingers to see if it were fertile, and drop it if it were not.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Chapman
      Oak-mast, and beech, and cornel fruit, they eat.
    • (Can we date this quote?) South
      Swine under an oak filling themselves with the mast.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mast (third-person singular simple present masts, present participle masting, simple past and past participle masted)

  1. (of swine and other animals) To feed on forest seed or fruit.
  2. (agriculture, forestry, ecology, of a population of plants) To vary fruit and seed production in multi-year cycles.
    • 1985, Michael Fenner, Seed ecology, page 33:
      Any individual tree which masted in a generally non-mast year would be subjected to the exclusive attention of the seed predators and so would be selected against.
    • 2004, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Christian Körner, Ernst-Detlef Schulze, Forest Diversity and Function: Temperate and Boreal Systems, page 28:
      However, if this were true, all or most masting species (e.g., Fagus and Quercus) in a forest would have to mast in synchrony to be effective against generalist herbivores.
    • 2008, Chris Rowthorn, Muhammad Cohen, China Williams, Borneo, page 50:
      Because dipterocarp seeds are winged and spin gracefully as they fall, the dispersal of millions of dipterocarp seeds during a masting event is one of the greatest spectacles that you can see on planet Earth.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mastь.

NounEdit

mast f

  1. ointment

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *mast, from Proto-Germanic *mastaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mast m (plural masten, diminutive mastje n)

  1. mast

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

NounEdit

mast m

  1. yoghurt (a milk-based product thickened by a bacterium-aided curdling process)


This Kurdish entry was created from the translations listed at yoghurt. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see mast in the Kurdish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *mastaz

NounEdit

mast m (plural masts)

  1. mast (structure found on watercraft)

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German mast (mast).

NounEdit

mast f, m (definite singular masta or masten, indefinite plural master, definite plural mastene)

  1. mast
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

mast

  1. past participle of mase

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *mastaz

NounEdit

mast m (oblique plural maz or matz, nominative singular maz or matz, nominative plural mast)

  1. mast (structure found on watercraft)

DescendantsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mastь.

NounEdit

mast f (Cyrillic spelling маст)

  1. grease
  2. ointment
  3. fat
  4. lard
  5. schmaltz

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

mast c

  1. mast, tall slim structure

DeclensionEdit