Last modified on 12 October 2014, at 22:55
See also: mąw-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mawe, from Old English maga (stomach, maw), from Proto-Germanic *magô (belly, stomach), from Proto-Indo-European *mak-, *maks- (bag, bellows, belly). Cognate with West Frisian mage, Low German mage, Dutch maag (stomach, belly), German Magen (stomach), Danish mave, Swedish mage (stomach, belly), and also with Welsh megin (bellows), Russian мошна (mošná, pocket, bag), Lithuanian mãkas (purse).

NounEdit

maw (plural maws)

  1. (archaic) the stomach, especially of an animal
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book X
      So Death shall be deceav'd his glut, and with us two / Be forc'd to satisfie his Rav'nous Maw.
  2. the upper digestive tract (where food enters the body), especially the mouth and jaws of a ravenous creature.
    • 1818, John Keats, Endymion
      To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw
  3. any great, insatiable or perilous opening.
  4. Appetite; inclination.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Unless you had more maw to do me good.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

By shortening of mother

NounEdit

maw (plural maws)

  1. (dialect, colloquial) Mother.

Etymology 3Edit

See mew (a gull).

NounEdit

maw (plural maws)

  1. A gull.

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maw m

  1. boy
    • Me a wrug desky Kernowak termyn me ve maw.
      • I learnt Cornish when I was a boy.

SynonymsEdit


MapudungunEdit

NounEdit

maw (using Unified Alphabet)

  1. rain