Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 23:38

mazer

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mazer, maser, from Old English *mæser, *maser (suggested by derivative mæseren), from Proto-Germanic *masuraz, cognate with Old High German masar (German Maser (spot)), Icelandic mösurr (maple). Reinforced in Middle English by Anglo-Norman mazer, Old French mazre (a kind of maple wood), from the same Germanic source.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mazer (plural mazers)

  1. (obsolete) The maple tree, or maple wood.
  2. (archaic or historical) A large drinking bowl made from such wood; a mazer bowl.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 16:
      Presently he rose up and set before each young man some meat in a charger and drink in a large mazer, treating me in like manner; and after that they sat questioning me concerning my adventures and what had betided me

Derived termsEdit