Last modified on 2 September 2014, at 18:10

modern

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French moderne, from Late Latin modernus; from Latin modo (just now), originally ablative of modus (measure); hence, by measure, "just now". See also mode.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveAdjective

modern (comparative moderner or more modern, superlative modernest or most modern)

  1. Pertaining to a current or recent time and style; not ancient.
    Our online interactive game is a modern approach to teaching about gum disease.
    Although it was built in the 1600s, the building still has a very modern look.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, chapter 1, The Amateur Poacher:
      But then I had the flintlock by me for protection. ¶ There were giants in the days when that gun was made; for surely no modern mortal could have held that mass of metal steady to his shoulder.
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55: 
      The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.

SynonymsSynonyms

AntonymsAntonyms

Derived termsDerived terms

TranslationsTranslations

NounNoun

modern (plural moderns)

  1. Someone who lives in modern times.
    • 1779, Edward Capell, ‎John Collins, Notes and various readings to Shakespeare
      What the moderns could mean by their suppression of the final couplet's repeatings, cannot be conceiv'd []
    • 1956, John Albert Wilson, The Culture of Ancient Egypt (page 144)
      Even though we moderns can never crawl inside the skin of the ancient and think and feel as he did [] we must as historians make the attempt.

ReferencesReferences

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AnagramsAnagrams


CatalanCatalan

EtymologyEtymology

Latin modernus

AdjectiveAdjective

modern m (feminine moderna, masculine plural moderns, feminine plural modernes)

  1. modern

Derived termsDerived terms


GermanGerman

Etymology 1Etymology 1

PronunciationPronunciation

AdjectiveAdjective

modern (comparative moderner, superlative am modernsten)

  1. modern
DeclensionDeclension

Etymology 2Etymology 2

PronunciationPronunciation

VerbVerb

modern (third-person singular simple present modert, past tense moderte, past participle gemodert, auxiliary haben)

  1. to rot, to molder
ConjugationConjugation

HungarianHungarian

EtymologyEtymology

From English modern and German modern, from French moderne, from Medieval Latin modernus.[1]

PronunciationPronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmodɛrn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mo‧dern

AdjectiveAdjective

modern (comparative modernebb, superlative legmodernebb)

  1. modern

ReferencesReferences

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

SwedishSwedish

PronunciationPronunciation

AdjectiveAdjective

modern (comparative modernare, superlative modernast)

  1. modern; pertaining to current style

DeclensionDeclension

Related termsRelated terms

NounNoun

modern

  1. definite singular of moder
  2. definite singular of mor