Last modified on 20 February 2015, at 10:46

moin

See also: móin and möin

GermanEdit

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EtymologyEdit

The etymology isn't clear.

  • It stems possibly from Low German moi, moie, moien, meaning 'nice', 'bright' or 'shiny', from Middle Low German, thus meaning would be '(have a) good one'. This would explain the pronunciation with /ŋ/ in some areas, which would stem from regular inflection of Low German moi.
  • It is also possible that this word is a borrowing from a Frisian language, which would explain the vowel squence /ɔːɪ/, which does not naturally occur in almost every Low German dialect.
  • Further, many sources say that the word comes from the Berlin area, representing a variant of local Low German morgen (morning) ([mɔrʝɘn]).[1][2] When German replaced Low German in Berlin, speakers of the city adopted the central German R-vocalisation, giving the pronunciation [mɔə̯jɘn], which then spread north.
  • Should this word be a Frisian or Berlinian borrowing, it is likely that it was later conflated with the Low German word moi (/moːɪ/).

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • moin moin (might be perceived as foreign or artificial in some regions, e.g. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern)

InterjectionEdit

moin

  1. (colloquial, Northern Germany) hi

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Br. v. Braunthal, Berliner Conversation, in den Akademiesälen, Berliner Conversations-Blatt für Poesie, Literatur und Kritik, 1828
  2. ^ Willy Lademann: Wörterbuch der Teltower Volkssprache (Telschet Wöderbuek), Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1956

German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

The etymology isn't clear.

  • It stems possibly from Low German moi, moie, moien, meaning 'nice', 'bright' or 'shiny', from Middle Low German, thus meaning would be '(have a) good one'. This would explain the pronunciation with /ŋ/ in some areas, which would stem from regular inflection of Low German moi.
  • It is also possible that this word is a borrowing from a Frisian language, which would explain the vowel squence /ɔːɪ/, which does not naturally occur in almost every Low German dialect.
  • Further, many sources say that the word comes from the Berlin area, representing a variant of local Low German morgen (morning) ([mɔrʝɘn]).[1][2] When German replaced Low German in Berlin, speakers of the city adopted the central German R-vocalisation, giving the pronunciation [mɔə̯jɘn], which then spread north.
  • Should this word be a Frisian or Berlinian borrowing, it is likely that it was later conflated with the Low German word moi (/moːɪ/).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

moin

  1. Eye dialect spelling of moi. (several inflections)
  2. (informal) hi

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Br. v. Braunthal, Berliner Conversation, in den Akademiesälen, Berliner Conversations-Blatt für Poesie, Literatur und Kritik, 1828
  2. ^ Willy Lademann: Wörterbuch der Teltower Volkssprache (Telschet Wöderbuek), Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1956