Last modified on 3 November 2014, at 02:27

monarch

EnglishEdit

A monarch butterfly.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French monarque, from Late Latin monarcha, from Ancient Greek μονάρχης (monárkhēs), variant of μόναρχος (mónarkhos, sole ruler), from 'μόνος (mónos, only) + ἀρχός (arkhós, leader).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

monarch (plural monarchs)

  1. The ruler of an absolute monarchy or the head of state of a constitutional monarchy.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act II, Scene II, line 25.
      Never was monarch better fear'd and lov'd / Than is your Majesty.
  2. The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, found in North America, so called because of the designs on its wings.
  3. (Australia, slang) Police.
    • 1961, Nene Gare, The Fringe Dwellers, Text Classics 2012, p. 41:
      ‘Skippy gets off. An ya know the first thing e says to them monarch? E turns round on em an yelps, “An now ya can just gimme back that bottle.”’

Usage notesEdit

See monarchy#Usage notes

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

A monarch can have any of the following titles:

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Latin monarchia, from Ancient Greek μονάρχης (monárkhēs), variant of μόναρχος (mónarkhos, sole ruler), from 'μόνος (mónos, only) + ἀρχός (arkhós, leader).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mo‧narch

NounEdit

monarch m (plural monarchen, diminutive monarchje n)

  1. monarch

Derived termsEdit