Last modified on 9 October 2014, at 11:36

monogram

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French monogramme, from the Classical Latin adjective monogrammus, from the conjectured Ancient Greek * μονόγραμμος (monógrammos, outlined”, “drawn with single lines).

NounEdit

monogram (plural monograms)

  1. (obsolete) A picture drawn in line only, before the colour and/or shading is applied; an outline sketch.

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Formed as mono- +‎ -gram, by analogy with epigram.

NounEdit

monogram (plural monograms)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A sentence consisting of only one line, or an epigram consisting of only one verse, of poetry.

ReferencesEdit

  • †monogram, n.²” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [draft revision; Mar. 2010]

Etymology 3Edit

The noun derives from the post-Classical Latin monogrammum, itself from the Byzantine Greek μονόγραμμον (monógrammon); compare the French and Middle French monogramme, as well as the Italian monogramma. The verb derives from the noun; compare the earlier adjective monogrammed and the slightly earlier noun monogramming.

NounEdit

The royal monogram of Marguerite of Lorraine (1615–1672), Duchess of Orléans and Alençon

monogram (plural monograms)

  1. A design composed of one or more letters, often intertwined, used as an identifying mark of an individual or institution.
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • monogram, n.³” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [draft revision; Mar. 2010]

VerbEdit

monogram (third-person singular simple present monograms, present participle monogramming, simple past and past participle monogrammed)

  1. (transitive) To mark something with a monogram.
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • monogram, v.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [draft revision; Mar. 2010]

AnagramsEdit


PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

NounEdit

monogram m

  1. monogram

DeclensionEdit