moratorium

See also: Moratorium and moratórium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

New Latin from Late Latin morātōrium, noun use of the neuter of morātōrius (moratory, delaying), from Latin moror (I delay), from mora (delay), from Proto-Indo-European *mere (to delay, hinder). See also moratory.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌmɒ.ɹəˈtɔː.ɹɪəm/, /ˌmɔː.ɹəˈtɔː.ɹɪəm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌmɔ.ɹəˈtɔ.ɹiəm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

moratorium (plural moratoriums or moratoria)

  1. (law) An authorization to a debtor, permitting temporary suspension of payments. [from 19th c.]
  2. A suspension of an ongoing activity. [from 20th c.]
    Canada may put a moratorium on cloning for research.
    • 1990, Gerhard Falk, Murder, an Analysis of its Forms, Conditions, and Causes, McFarland.
      It so happened that at that time the moratorium on the death penalty caused by the Supreme Court decision in the Furman case was still in effect.

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

moratorium n (singular definite moratoriet, plural indefinite moratorier)

  1. moratorium
InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (suspension of payments): henstand
  • (suspension of an ongoing activity): stop

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

NounEdit

moratorium n

  1. moratorium

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 01:55