Last modified on 28 May 2014, at 13:25

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mokkus (compare Welsh moch, Cornish mogh, Breton moc'h).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mucc f (ā-stem, genitive muca or muice, nominative plural mucca)

  1. pig, sow
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 47b1
      mucc glosses sus
  2. a war engine: a shed to cover sappers

DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mucc
also mmucc after a proclitic
mucc
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
mucc
also mmucc after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]