Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:41
See also: Nap and NAP

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (to doze, slumber, sleep), from Proto-Germanic *hnappōną (to nap). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (> Middle High German nafzen (to slumber) > German dialectal napfezen, nafzen (to nod, slumber, nap)).

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. A short period of sleep, especially one during the day
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for collocations of nap

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to have a nap; to sleep for a short period of time, especially during the day
  2. to be off one's guard
    • Hudibras
      I took thee napping, unprepared.
    The regulators were caught napping by the financial collapse.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English nappe, from Middle Dutch

NounEdit

nap (uncountable)

  1. A soft or fuzzy surface on fabric or leather.
    • 1591, King Henry VI part II, by William Shakespeare
      I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 16
      On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 37:
      There were low bookshelves, there was a thick pinkish Chinese rug in which a gopher could have spent a week without showing his nose above the nap.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather)

Etymology 3Edit

  • From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France (Bonaparte)

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. (UK) A type of bet in British horse racing, based on the experts' best tips
  2. (uncountable, games) A card game in which players take tricks; properly Napoleon
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

possibly Scandanavian, cognate with nab, see Swedish nappa (pinch)

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (obsolete) to grab; to nab
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From French napper, from nappe (nape).

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (cooking) To cover (something) with a sauce (usually in passive)
    • 2006, Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs‎:
      Vanilla ice cream topped with a poached or canned pear half, napped with chocolate sauce, and garnished with toasted sliced almonds.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin napus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip, Brassica rapa

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch nap, from Old Dutch nap, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural nappen, diminutive napje n)

  1. drinking cup

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap (plural napok)

  1. day
    Egy hét 7 napból áll. - A week consists of 7 days.
  2. sun (also written Nap in astronomical context)
    Süt a nap. - The sun is shining.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin napus

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip Brassica rapa

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāpus.

NounEdit

nap m (plural napi)

  1. turnip or swede (Brassica napus)
  2. carrot

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit