Last modified on 2 April 2015, at 00:01

nap

See also: Nap and NAP

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (to doze, slumber, sleep), from Proto-Germanic *hnappōną (to nap). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (> Middle High German nafzen (to slumber) > German dialectal napfezen, nafzen (to nod, slumber, nap)).

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. A short period of sleep, especially one during the day
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for collocations of nap

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to have a nap; to sleep for a short period of time, especially during the day
  2. to be off one's guard
    • Hudibras
      I took thee napping, unprepared.
    The regulators were caught napping by the financial collapse.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English nappe, from Middle Dutch

NounEdit

nap (uncountable)

  1. A soft or fuzzy surface on fabric or leather.
    • 1591, King Henry VI part II, by William Shakespeare
      I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 16
      On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 37:
      There were low bookshelves, there was a thick pinkish Chinese rug in which a gopher could have spent a week without showing his nose above the nap.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather)

Etymology 3Edit

  • From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France (Bonaparte)

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. (UK) A type of bet in British horse racing, based on the experts' best tips
  2. (uncountable, card games) A card game in which players take tricks; properly Napoleon
  3. A bid to take five tricks in the card game Napoleon.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Possibly of North Germanic origin, cognate with nab, see Swedish nappa (to pinch).

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (obsolete) to grab; to nab
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From French napper, from nappe (nape).

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (cooking) To cover (something) with a sauce (usually in passive)
    • 2006, Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs‎:
      Vanilla ice cream topped with a poached or canned pear half, napped with chocolate sauce, and garnished with toasted sliced almonds.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin napus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip, Brassica rapa

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch nap, from Old Dutch nap, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural nappen, diminutive napje n)

  1. drinking cup

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap (plural napok)

  1. day
    Egy hét 7 napból áll. - A week consists of 7 days.
  2. sun (also written Nap in astronomical context)
    Süt a nap. - The sun is shining.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin napus

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip Brassica rapa

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāpus.

NounEdit

nap m (plural napi)

  1. turnip or swede (Brassica napus)
  2. carrot

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit