nescience

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nescientia, from the present participle of nescire.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nescience (uncountable)

  1. The absence of knowledge; ignorance, especially of orthodox beliefs.
    • 1911, Ralph Barton Perry, "Notes on the Philosophy of Henri Bergson," The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods, vol. 8, no. 26, p. 720,
      To lapse from knowledge into nescience is always possible—there is no law of God or man forbidding it.
  2. (philosophy) The doctrine that nothing is actually knowable.
    • 1895, J. G. Schurman, "Agnosticism," The Philosophical Review, vol. 4, no. 3, p. 244,
      The theory of nescience is but the obverse of the fact of science.

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • nescience” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
Last modified on 28 November 2013, at 14:49